CONSIDERING CATARACT SURGERY? CONSIDER THE NEW SYMFONY LENS !!

Written by editor
August 22, 2016

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By the age of 80, over half of all Americans suffer from a cataract or have undergone cataract surgery. It is important to note that cataracts do not just affect seniors. In 2016, approximately one in four cataract surgery will be completed on those under the age of 65. Because of this, it is important to recommend another lens that Horizon Eye Care will be offering very soon for those who choose to have cataract surgery.
There are multiple lens options for patients who undergo cataract surgery, but coming soon is an even more innovative and full-coverage lens that really promises a continuous-high quality vision following the surgery. This lens is called the Tecnis Symfony. Not only are these lenses beneficial following cataract surgery, but they also reduce the effects of presbyopia, the ability to see up close, by aiding those who suffer from it focus on near objects. There is also a version of this lens for those with astigmatism called the Symfony Toric IOL.
What is so special about the Symfony lens, is that it provides premium continuous vision so patients can decrease their dependence on glasses while seeing clearly at “near, intermediate and far-away distances, and points in between” even if they suffer from presbyopia and astigmatism (source). Another important trait about this particular lens is it was created with “features to improve both the range and quality of vision,” whereas a typical monofocal lens only allows the person to see further away and does not improve his or her up-close vision (source).
The new Symfony lens also:
 “Provides seamless, day-to-night vision. Patients could see objects sharply and clearly at near, intermediate and far away distances, and points in between.
 “Provides high-quality vision. Some IOLs may leave patients with an inability to focus clearly due to competing wavelengths of light passing through the lens at different angles (known as chromatic aberration), or with vision that is not completely focused because of the shape of the lens (known as spherical aberration). The Symfony lens has been engineered to correct these issues.
 “Demonstrates a low incidence of halo and glare, which may be perceived as rings or blurring around bright lights. Glare and halo can sometimes affect an individual’s ability to drive at night or to perform other visual tasks” (source).


Category: Cataracts, F-Y-Eye, Uncategorized


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